Sight word Game Cards

This resource can be used to play two games: Pelmanism (memory) or Snap.  You may think of other games as well.

Game One: Pelmanism

In Britain it is called Pelmanism after Christopher Louis Pelman, who founded the “Pelman Institute for the Scientific Development of Mind, Memory and Personality” in London in 1899.

You need to create two sets of word cards –  two of each word.  Shuffle and place them face down.  The first player turns over a card and reads the word.  He then turns over another card and reads the word.  If the cards match he gets to keep the pair and play again.  See the ‘How To Play’ file included for more details.

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Game Two: Snap

I could vouch for this game being fun, fun, fun!  My students love this one.  You need only one set of word cards – one of each word.  Shuffle and place the cards face up.  One person (teacher or student)  calls a word from the set.  Students ‘snap’ the word (cover with their hand).  The first one to snap the word gets to keep it.

  snap set upsnapping 1 

Both games enhance memory, visual discrimination and of course reinforce instant recognition of high-frequency or sight words taught.

The package includes:

  • 1 .pdf file with 2 pages which you need to print back and front.  The front is blank for you to insert your own words.
  • 1 How To Play word document
  • 1 Terms of Use notepad file

I hope you and your students enjoy this resource as we work, play and grow together.

download button for Limited Resources

 

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Parking Lot for Sight Words

Here’s another nice resource I saw online and thought I would make it myself for my class.  It is a parking lot for sight words.  The word is called and the child drives a car into the correct parking space.  As usual I changed the original one a bit.  Here‘s the original one.

Here’s mine.  the lot  Since I’m working with limited resources, I laminated these and wrote the target words on with a dry erase marker.  In this way, I can use the lots over and over again.

I wanted to use it whole class and wanted to be able to tell at a glance if the child had parked on the right spot.  So, I put in ‘bumpers’ just before the word.  The cars cannot cross the bumpers.

ready to rumble  Here they are, getting ready to enter the parking lot.  They made little engine noises as they drove and when another word was called, I encouraged them to reverse and go forward like a real car would, instead of jumping lanes.

driving to the word  On the right, they are driving towards the word ‘his’.  Someone may be going the wrong way!

 

parked at his  In order to prevent copying, I put the words in different places on each lot so the children look for the word rather than just follow the person next to them.

 

Here’s the entire set.   The cars were purchased locally at a variety store.

the package       package

 

My main reason for making resources is to allow further reinforcement and learning to take place in the children’s free time.  They can use this resource on their own.  A child who knows the words well can use the flashcards to call the words.  To facilitate that, I included the flashcards with the target words and a dry erase marker.  The entire set fits nicely into a plastic zip bag (the kind you get when you purchase curtains).  Isn’t that just handy?  After all, we’re working with limited resources here.

Do enjoy!  The children certainly do!

Here’s the best part.  You can download the template for this parking lot if you like.  Just print, laminate and rev up those engines!  Here you go.

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